Another Look at the Old Testament

Why it’s so important!

Although we’re not under Old Testament law, there is great value in being familiar with the 39 books that make up three-fourths of the Bible.

Reading the New Testament without knowing the Old is like reading a sequel but not the original work.

The New Testament keeps pointing back to the Old. It refers to Abraham, Moses, David, and many other Old Testament characters. It quotes from Genesis, Psalms, Isaiah, and many other Old Testament books.

On the day Jesus rose He said, “These are My words which I spoke to you while I was still with you, that all things which are written about Me in the Law of Moses and the Prophets and the Psalms must be fulfilled” (Luke 24:44).

What we can learn

These 39 books were written by about 30 men—all inspired by the Holy Spirit (2 Timothy 3:16; 1 Peter 1:10-12; 2 Peter 1:20-21). Though originally addressed to Jews, the Old Testament instructs Christians as well: “For whatever was written in earlier times was written for our instruction, so that through perseverance and the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope” (Romans 15:4; see 1 Corinthians 10:1-11).

There’s so much to be gained from these ancient documents. We learn from Noah’s obedient faith, Job’s sufferings, and Esther’s courageous stand.

We see how God was patiently working out His great plan, laying the groundwork for Jesus’ coming into our world to be our Savior.

Well worth the effort

By reading only four chapters a day you can complete the Old Testament in less than eight months. If we get bogged down and quit when we read the detailed Mosiac laws in Exodus and Leviticus, we’ll miss the dramatic stories of Joshua, the tragic period of the Judges, the ups-and-downs of the Kings, the inspiring poetry of the Psalms, and the struggles of the prophets.

The more we read, the greater blessing we’ll find in its pages.

So please, read it all. You’ll be glad you did!

man reading Bible-tagged

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB: http://www.lockman.org/

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